novembro 28, 2010

Cellist GUY JOHNSTON becomes ambassador for musicians launchpad

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We are pleased to announce that cellist Guy Johnston, a fast-rising star on the international concert circuit, has become an ambassador for Musicians Launchpad. This programme is aimed at providing promising young musicians with the support and training they need to ensure they have the best chance of success in the future.

Through the early stages of his career Guy received help from both the Ian Fleming Charitable Trust and the Guilhermina Suggia Gift. Regarding these awards Guy says, "I am so grateful to the Musicians Benevolent Fund for supporting my early years of development. The help, advice and funding enabled me to study in America and fulfil my potential at a crucial stage.” Guy has gone on to become "one of the country’s most promising and distinctive cellists” (The Strad), after making his well received debut at the BBC Proms performing the Elgar Cello Concerto with the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

Recent highlights for Guy included a tour of Japan with the Osaka Philharmonic and the Sapporo Symphony Orchestra/Ottaka (Elgar Cello Concerto), Dvorak Cello Concerto with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic/Robin Ticciati, Elgar Cello Concerto wth the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Michael Seal, Britten Symphony for Cello and Orchestra with Northern Sinfonia/Robin Ticciati, and an Elgar Cello Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra/Stephen Cleobury. Guy will also be touring with the Aronowitz Ensemble, of which he is a founder member, throughout the UK until December 2010.

Find out more information and how you can help with Musicians Launchpad, and pay a visit to Guy Johnston's website.

Publicado por vm em 11:32 AM | Comentários (0)

novembro 10, 2010

PIANO A 4 MÃOS - MÚSICA DE DEBUSSY E RAVEL INTERPRETADA POR LÍGIA MADEIRA E LUÍS DUARTE - 17 de NOVEMBRO (4.ª-FEIRA) - 19H00 - INSTITUTO FRANCO-PORTUGUÊS - LISBOA

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Instituto Franco-Português
Avenida Luís Bívar, 91
Lisboa, Portugal

Concerto ANTENA 2

Claude Debussy - “Petite Suite

- En Bateau
- Cortège
- Menuet
- Ballet

Claude Debussy - “Six Epigraphes Antiques

- Pour invoquer Pan, dieu du vent d’été
- Pour un tombeau sans nom
- Pour que la nuit soit propice
- Pour la danseuse aux crotales
- Pour l'Égyptienne
- Pour remercier la pluie au matin


Maurice Ravel - “Ma mère l’oye

- Pavane de la Belle au bois dormant
- Petit Poucet
- Laideronnette, Impératrice des Pagodes
- Les entretiens de la Belle et de la Bête
- Le jardin féerique


PIANO:
LÍGIA MADEIRA e
LUÍS DUARTE

Publicado por vm em 11:04 AM | Comentários (0)

novembro 09, 2010

"MÚSICA EM DIÁLOGO COM O MAESTRO JOSÉ ATALAYA" - JORGE MOYANO INTERPRETA CHOPIN - SÁBADO, 13 de NOVEMBRO 16H00 - CENTRO DE APOIO SOCIAL DE OEIRAS

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MÚSICA EM DIÁLOGO COM O MAESTRO JOSÉ ATALAYA
Sábado, 13 de Novembro às 16h00

Centro de Apoio Social de Oeiras

(ex Complexo das Forças Armadas) Rua D. Duarte, 2

Programa

CHOPIN – SCHERZO; NOCTURNOS; VALSAS; BARCAROLA

JORGE MOYANO - piano

Publicado por vm em 05:37 PM | Comentários (0)

novembro 06, 2010

AUDITÓRIO MUNICIPAL RUI DE CARVALHO (CARNAXIDE) - SÁBADO, 6 de NOVEMBRO DE 2010 - 18H00 - SEQUEIRA COSTA - CONCERTO DE HOMENAGEM A CHOPIN

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Sábado, 6 de Novembro às 18h00

Progama

W. A. MOZART

Abertura da Ópera “Don Giovanni”
Andante. Molto Allegro

F. CHOPIN

Concerto para piano N.º 1 em Mi menor Op. 11
Allegro maestoso
Romanze. Larghetto
Rondo. Vivace

W. A. MOZART

Sinfonia N.º 38 em Ré Maior K504 “Praga”
Adagio. Allegro
Andante
Finale. Presto

Prof. Sequeira Costa piano

Maestro Alexander Frey direcção

Orquestra de Câmara de Cascais e Oeiras


Entrada gratuita (a partir dos 8 anos), limitada aos lugares disponíveis
Entrega de senhas, a partir das 17 horas, na bilheteira do auditório


Publicado por vm em 11:20 AM | Comentários (0)

novembro 01, 2010

DONALD TOVEY - SONATA PARA 2 VIOLONCELOS DEDICADA A GUILHERMINA SUGGIA E PABLO CASALS

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Discover Tovey's Sonata for Two Cellos
You'll find this work is a Romantic-style treat
By James Reel

STRINGS

What happens when a fine two-cello sonata intended to celebrate the relationship of a great instrumentalist and his paramour turns out to play a role in their breakup? The sonata—even one written for Pablo Casals—falls into obscurity for nearly a century.

In the autumn of 1912, Casals invited several friends to join him at his vacation home in the Mediterranean coastal town of Playa San Salvador, near Barcelona. The household included Casals; his temperamental lover, the cellist Guilhermina Suggia; composer Enrique Granados and his wife; the young pianist Mieczyslaw Horszowski; and Donald Francis Tovey, an English pianist, composer, and classical-music popularizer. One of the plans was to have everyone indulge their passion for chamber music, but this was impractical—aside from the two cellists, all the other musicians were pianists. To salvage the vacation, Tovey wrote a 20-minute sonata especially for Casals and Suggia, leaving the pianists to their own devices.

The sonata, in a rich style resembling that of Brahms, might have become a repertoire staple with the advocacy of Casals. Unfortunately, Casals and Tovey had a nasty quarrel over Suggia. Exactly what happened is unclear: Tovey, a proper Englishman, kept mum about possible indiscretions; and Casals refused even to mention Suggia in his memoirs. But the fight sent Tovey back to London and Suggia to her native Portugal. The lovers attempted a reconciliation, unsuccessfully. Casals and Tovey didn’t come to terms with each other until 1925. But by then, thoughts of promoting the sonata had been abandoned.

Gone but Not Forgotten
In the 1970s, not long after Casals’ death, a young cellist named Marcy Rosen came across the sonata’s manuscript at the Marlboro Festival, where Casals had frequently performed during his final years. Just for fun, she tried it out with cellist Anne Martindale Williams, but had no opportunity to play it in public until several years later. The Mendelssohn String Quartet, which Rosen cofounded, was supervising a winter music institute, and Rosen was looking for something she could play with guest artist Joel Krosnick of the Juilliard Quartet.

The Tovey sonata was the clear choice.

Says Rosen, “There’s nothing else for two cellos of that magnitude and that kind of challenge, with such beauty.”

Rosen recently recorded the sonata with cellist Frances Rowell for the Bridge label (Bridge 9264). Although the work has never been in print, Rosen is preparing an edition that will be published by the end of this year.

That edition should bring renewed interest in Tovey, who lived from 1875 to 1940. His early ambitions were to be a composer and pianist. He was sufficiently fine at the latter effort to be the Joachim Quartet’s official guest pianist for 20 years, starting in 1894. During that period he also enjoyed some successful performances of his own compositions in London, Berlin, and Vienna.

It was during this time that Tovey found his true calling. He began writing detailed, analytical notes for concert programs. That work intensified in 1917 when he founded the Reid Orchestra in Edinburgh, where he served as music-department chair. As a conductor, Tovey was apparently technically inept, but his program notes were remarkable for conveying detailed information about a score’s structure to a musically unschooled audience, without resorting to much specialized vocabulary. In the 1930s, his notes were published as the six-volume Essays in Musical Analysis. He also provided celebrated commentaries for editions of Beethoven’s piano sonatas and Bach’s Well-Tempered Klavier.

A Nod to Brahms
Tovey venerated Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and other German masters, whose music lends itself to structural analysis (as opposed to the French, where the primary interest tends to be tune and timbre). As a composer he was heavily indebted to Brahms, and perhaps this is one reason he wrote little music after World War I, aside from an opera and a cello concerto for Casals, once they’d reconciled.

That rich, romantic style was no longer in fashion.

But Romanticism still had life in it when Tovey wrote his two-cello sonata in 1912. “He was a composer on a grand scale,” says Rosen, “not as successful as Brahms or Schumann, but he would have liked his ideas to have been considered in that same vein.”

The sonata falls into three movements. The first, in proper sonata-allegro form, is the most Brahmsian. Indeed, it bears out an earlier remark by Joseph Joachim, for whom Brahms wrote his violin concerto, that “of all musicians now alive, Tovey is without doubt the one who would have interested Brahms the most.” The slow second movement is a set of variations on a Catalonian folk song, in tribute to Casals’ homeland. The concluding presto giocoso is a spectacular contrapuntal movement honoring Bach, whom both Tovey and Casals revered. The two cello parts are equal: the first tends to lie about a third higher than the second, but otherwise they are complementary, and of comparable difficulty. Says Rosen, “An in-joke is that the final flashy runs in the first and last movements take place in the second cello part, which was written for Mme. Suggia, so in a funny way she has the final word.”

It’s no wonder Casals neglected the sonata after the breakup.

“There are other little private jokes in the piece,” she says, “including a quote from the third Bach suite and one from the Brahms G major sextet.”

Cellists shouldn’t expect to toss off a lighthearted trifle, though. “There’s a lot of practicing that has to be done,” Rosen warns, “because there’s a lot of technical playing. It’s hard, and it’s a great piece to practice when I need to get in shape, especially some of the passagework. You have to look at it as a serious work that you have to study and develop a feeling for, just as we would a piece by Brahms. Look for the depth in it.”

It’s not just deep; the writing also can be thick. “There’s a lot to work out in terms of getting the lines through and making sure one part isn’t too loud or too soft,” Rosen says. “In the double-stop passage in the first part of the middle movement, it’s really difficult to get the melodic material out.

“It’s a very scary piece to perform, because both cellos go up so high and down so low, and nobody gets a break; there are no restful parts where you can relax. It’s a challenge all the way through, but it’s totally worthwhile. Give yourself time to learn it really thoroughly. It has a very romantic, luscious sonority, it’s very lyrical, and harmonically it moves in a surprising way.

“Tovey writes very well for the cello, but some of the passagework, especially the faster things, is very pianistic. Schumann didn’t write that well for stringed instruments, either, but you still want to play his music. I hope that people will love this.

“For cellists to have something big and romantic of our very own is a great treat.”

Publicado por vm em 02:51 PM | Comentários (0)